Why Flex Work Is Not a Stretch

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Home » Why Flex Work Is Not a Stretch

Why Flex Work Is Not a Stretch
Yahoo and Best Buy have reduced job flexibility for workers. Is the trend toward all hands on deck in the office or creating a schedule that’s friendly to employees’ lives?
Ed Frauenheim

May 29, 2013

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Despite blows to flexible work at Yahoo Inc. and Best Buy Co., the practice is alive and well at medical device-maker Medtronic Inc.
The 3-year-old program saves Medtronic some $1.2 million a year in leased office space, boosts productivity and improves the company’s ability to attract top job candidates, says Victor Assad, the company’s senior human resources director.
The company has no intention of rolling back its flex-work effort, even though earlier this year Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer curtailed telecommuting and Best Buy quit its pioneering program to let employees pick their hours and when they would come to the office. Assad says Medtronic has taken pains to prevent common problems associated with teleworking, such as bosses’ fears that they will lose control over their direct reports. If anything, the program has improved the way some supervisors manage their people, Assad says, because the company urged leaders to make home-office employees’ goals crystal clear.